North Korea Starts Nuclear Reactor

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North Korea starts nuclear reactor

Racing ahead

The move comes as Pyongyang has made it clear it’s also racing ahead with the production of intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs), the type of projectile that would be used to deliver a nuclear warhead.
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US and South Korean officials said that the country may be preparing two ICBMs for testing in the near future, just weeks after President Kim Jong Un said the country is in the final stages of preparing its ICBM.
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North Korea’s attempts to develop its missile technology come after a year of heightened nuclear activity.

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Sanctions
Nuclear events
2006
July
UN condemns North Korea’s launch of ballistic missiles and restricts all sales of “missile or missile-related” items and technology to the country.
October
Following North Korea’s first nuclear test, the UN imposes sanctions on the country, including the sale of items which may assist with their nuclear program and military items, such as aircraft, helicopters and tanks.
October
North Korea’s first nuclear test detected, less than 1 kiloton according to US intelligence — the equivalent of under 1,000 tons of TNT.
2007
2009

June
Security Council expresses their “gravest” concern after North Korea’s nuclear test in May, expanding sanctions to most arms imports.

May
A second nuclear missile weapon test is detected, this time as an underground explosion. The USGS registers it as a 4.7 magnitude seismic disturbance.
2010
2013
January
More sanctions are imposed by the UN, in response to a North Korean satellite launch. North Korean officials and organizations related to the space program see their assets frozen.

March
In response to February nuclear test, UN once again condemns and puts more sanctions on North Korea, extending the asset freeze to more individuals and organizations. Luxury goods such as yachts and racing cars also put under sanctions.

February
First nuclear test under new North Korean leader Kim Jong Un occurs, with the explosion of a 6 to 7 kiloton bomb, according to North Korea.

2014
2016
January
North Korea claims to their fourth nuclear bomb test, although independent observers remain unconvinced as the explosion took place deep underground, making it hard to measure.

September
The largest nuclear test yet takes place, a blast equivalent to 10 kilotons, ten times stronger than their first test a decade ago.

In early January, President Trump promised that North Korea wouldn’t develop a nuclear weapon capable of reaching the US.

The THAAD question

One thing that’s almost sure to come up is the implementation of the Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) missile system in South Korea.
The system is designed to take down a potential incoming projectiles and has been cited as a way to potentially stop a nuclear attack from North Korea.
Japan has also expressed interest in deploying the system on its own territory.
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There was concern that Trump would take a step back on THAAD’s deployment, but South Korean government representatives have said that South Korean National Security Office chief Kim Kwan-jin met with incoming US National Security Adviser Michael Flynn, who reaffirmed that THAAD’s deployment will be moving ahead as planned.
Though the US believes the missile system is defensive in nature, Russia and China are vehemently opposed to it.
Both countries believe the system is a strategic tool to box each of them in, as THAAD is close enough that it could track and possibly take down their missiles.

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World News

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